lioness.

Apr 24

(Source: orangieporangiepuddingpie, via word-is-bond)

tayloraves:

Guys I made this. (:
May 16

tayloraves:

Guys I made this. (:

(Source: randomshitilikeyo)

Sep 4

nevver:

Tell me about yourself

bohemea:

The Lost Boys
Sep 4

bohemea:

The Lost Boys

tylerknott:

Typewriter Series #67 by Tyler Knott Gregson
Aug 12

tylerknott:

Typewriter Series #67 by Tyler Knott Gregson

(via acciohere)

sequinsandsideeye:

Busy hustling, grinding, working hard I heard the familiar ghcat ping to see it’s my main girl, Selena with a link to an article. 
Oh shit. This is good she says. 
“When you stop trying to change others and work on changing yourself, your world changes for the better.” ~Unknown
There are certain relationships that we don’t want to end; we just want them to improve.
Sometimes it might seem like that will only happen if someone else starts acting differently—with more kindness, respect, thoughtfulness, compassion, understanding, or consideration.
Years ago, a therapist told me we can’t ever change other people; we can only change how we respond to them.
At the time, I found this incredibly frustrating because I didn’t know what I could do differently. I only knew I wanted to be treated better because I was tired of feeling bad.
But what do we do when we respond more calmly, or try to see things differently, but we still find ourselves getting hurt?
Sometimes we don’t want to completely close a door, with a family member, for example; we just don’t know how to keep it open without opening ourselves up to pain.
I’ve learned that changing our response to people means changing how we engage with them.
It can mean seeing someone less frequently, or avoiding certain topics, or knowing when to change the subject.
It might mean refusing to feel guilty or defensive, taking things less personally, or modeling the type of behavior we’d like to see in them.
It might also mean accepting that not all relationships need to be close and intimate.
As much as we might want someone to fill a certain role in our lives, they have to want to do it. And if they aren’t, it’s our job to recognize that so we don’t continually cause ourselves stress by trying to smash a square peg into a round hole.
Little in this world is more painful than wanting to be close with someone but knowing it’s a recipe for disaster. It’s harder when we think it could be so simple if that person could just realize how much we care and try, even if a little, to reciprocate it like we deserve.
But we generally don’t change when other people force us to do it; we change when we realize what we might lose if we don’t, and recognize that the discomfort of doing things differently is better than the pain of that loss.
We can’t make someone else make an effort. But we can make smart decisions for our own well-being. This may inspire someone else to change; it might not. Either way, we’ve honored the most important relationship in our lives: the one we have with ourselves.
~She’s right. That is good and her timing was (as always) impeccable. We cannot make someone make effort, but we can make smart decisions for our own well being. ~
A little more Monday wisdom from me (and Selena) to you. 
Jun 11

sequinsandsideeye:

Busy hustling, grinding, working hard I heard the familiar ghcat ping to see it’s my main girl, Selena with a link to an article

Oh shit. This is good she says. 

“When you stop trying to change others and work on changing yourself, your world changes for the better.” ~Unknown

There are certain relationships that we don’t want to end; we just want them to improve.

Sometimes it might seem like that will only happen if someone else starts acting differently—with more kindness, respect, thoughtfulness, compassion, understanding, or consideration.

Years ago, a therapist told me we can’t ever change other people; we can only change how we respond to them.

At the time, I found this incredibly frustrating because I didn’t know what I could do differently. I only knew I wanted to be treated better because I was tired of feeling bad.

But what do we do when we respond more calmly, or try to see things differently, but we still find ourselves getting hurt?

Sometimes we don’t want to completely close a door, with a family member, for example; we just don’t know how to keep it open without opening ourselves up to pain.

I’ve learned that changing our response to people means changing how we engage with them.

It can mean seeing someone less frequently, or avoiding certain topics, or knowing when to change the subject.

It might mean refusing to feel guilty or defensive, taking things less personally, or modeling the type of behavior we’d like to see in them.

It might also mean accepting that not all relationships need to be close and intimate.

As much as we might want someone to fill a certain role in our lives, they have to want to do it. And if they aren’t, it’s our job to recognize that so we don’t continually cause ourselves stress by trying to smash a square peg into a round hole.

Little in this world is more painful than wanting to be close with someone but knowing it’s a recipe for disaster. It’s harder when we think it could be so simple if that person could just realize how much we care and try, even if a little, to reciprocate it like we deserve.

But we generally don’t change when other people force us to do it; we change when we realize what we might lose if we don’t, and recognize that the discomfort of doing things differently is better than the pain of that loss.

We can’t make someone else make an effort. But we can make smart decisions for our own well-being. This may inspire someone else to change; it might not. Either way, we’ve honored the most important relationship in our lives: the one we have with ourselves.

~She’s right. That is good and her timing was (as always) impeccable. We cannot make someone make effort, but we can make smart decisions for our own well being. ~

A little more Monday wisdom from me (and Selena) to you. 

(Source: glitterandshade)

Jun 3

(Source: humungus, via wearetheweirdos)

rockabillyreese:

Blood Rain: inspired by Day of the Dead.
18x24Oil on Canvas
Reese HilburnRockabillyReeseBuy this Print on my  Etsy Page. If you like my work, please visit me on my FaceBook Page!

Support my girl Reese. Her artwork is fucking amazing!!!!!
May 24

rockabillyreese:

Blood Rain: inspired by Day of the Dead.

18x24
Oil on Canvas

Reese Hilburn
RockabillyReese

Buy this Print on my Etsy Page.

If you like my work, please visit me on my FaceBook Page!

Support my girl Reese. Her artwork is fucking amazing!!!!!

bbook:

Wes Anderson’s much-anticipated new film, Moonrise Kingdom, is a wistful look at the dichotomy between youth’s blind intelligence and adulthood’s cynical detachment told through the eyes of two young outsiders in love. From the master of corduroy twee and emotionally affectless children, the film looks like a catalogue for a Wes Anderson film. Much of that is due to the work of production designer Adam Stockhausen. We asked the young Mr. Stockhausen what goes into making the New England universe in which the two young heroes, Khaki scout Sam and his tween love interest Suzy, inhabit.
Inside the World of Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom
May 24

bbook:

Wes Anderson’s much-anticipated new film, Moonrise Kingdom, is a wistful look at the dichotomy between youth’s blind intelligence and adulthood’s cynical detachment told through the eyes of two young outsiders in love. From the master of corduroy twee and emotionally affectless children, the film looks like a catalogue for a Wes Anderson film. Much of that is due to the work of production designer Adam Stockhausen. We asked the young Mr. Stockhausen what goes into making the New England universe in which the two young heroes, Khaki scout Sam and his tween love interest Suzy, inhabit.

Inside the World of Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom

May 18

(Source: heck-yesiamreckless, via beautifulsickmind)